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Great Horned Owl

Great horned owl

Great horned owl

The Great Horned Owl, scientific name: Bubo virginianus, also known as the “winged tiger” measures 18-25 inches in length and has an average wingspan of 48 inches. The Great Horned Owl is a highly adaptable species and can be found in various climates throughout all of North America and some parts of South America as well. The owl is a non-migratory bird and travels based solely on the breeding season and the availability of prey.

Great Horned Owls are largely nocturnal and begin hunting for small rodents, reptiles, amphibians, insects and even other birds at dusk. They are silent killers and can lift prey 2-3 times their own size. Smaller animals like rodents and lizards can be swallowed whole.

Nesting season for the Great Horned Owl is January and February. The Great Horned owl pair do not build their own nests but instead utilize the nests of other birds and sometimes even squirrels. In these nests, the female owl will lay 3-4 eggs. The female takes full responsibility for incubating the eggs. Even though Great Horned Owls are solitary in nature, breeding pairs will often “haunt” their breeding ground for almost one year after their young leave the nest before they separate.

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